Burns Night

As we’re gearing up for Burns Night, we’re sharing an old classic: Haggis, Neeps and Tatties.

Burns Night is a celebration of the life and poetry of the poet Robert Burns, also known as Rabbie Burns, who penned more than 550 poems and songs before his death in 1796. Burns Night suppers are normally held on or near the poet’s birthday, 25 January and typically include haggis (a traditional Scottish dish), Scotch whiskey and the recitation of Burns’s poetry. To learn more click here.

Sloane’s Haggis, Neeps and Tatties

Serves  4

2x Sloane’s Haggis

500ml Sloane’s Onion Gravy

1kg swede

1kg large potatoes

100ml milk

60g butter

Salt & pepper

 

Sloane’s Haggis, Neeps & Tatties
Sloane’s Haggis, Neeps & Tatties

 

 

The ingredients

Haggis is made with a mix of lamb offal, ground beef and pinhead oats. All mixed together and stuffed a special casing. Traditionally a sheep’s stomach would be used, but now a synthetic casing is more common.

How to cook

Cut your potatoes into 3-4cm chunks and boil in lightly salted water until soft. Once soft, drain and leave to steam for 5 minutes before mashing.
Cut the swede into 3-4cm chunks and boil in lightly salted water until soft. Once soft, drain and leave to steam for 5 minutes before mashing. Season with a little salt and a good amount of pepper.

While the potatoes and swede are cooking, gently heat the haggis in hot water, but try not to boil it. It will take about 20-30 minutes to warm through. Sloane’s Haggis is already cooked, so it just needs to get hot and soften.

Finish the mash by placing the milk and butter in the pan used to boil the potatoes, return to the heat and warm gently until the butter has melted. Add the potatoes and mash using either a potato masher or potato ricer. Stir well and season with salt and pepper.

Warm the Onion Gravy in a pan until hot through.

Spoon the mash onto large warm serving plates, followed by the swede. Place the haggis in the center and cut the casing along the middle so the inside can be spooned out. Serve with a jug of gravy on the side.

 

Recipe by Joe Sloane